how easy air filter maintenance

Like humans, the engine innards must be always healthy and clean. That's why the air filter is so important. When air quality filter device to the fuel does not function properly, the incoming air with the fuel into the engine room is sometimes mixed with dust and disrupt the performance of the machine. The simplest result in the engine 'coughed'.
For that, we should always be careful in selecting an air filter on the market. Indeed, maintenance is relatively easy, just remove the filter from the nest, then spray compressor. Only, if not treated properly, may not be very long lived.


Various brands of air filter is very abundant in the market today. Of which are made of cardboard and become standard parts of the vehicle. Listening to various types of air filters on the market, surely take care of different ways. Because of this, look trick to keep the filter clean and well maintained.
To filter made of cardboard, at best, only the remaining life of about 2500 km to 5000 km. The rest, should be replaced immediately. Because of the weakness of this filter, at a certain lifetime, the surface of the cardboard into 'hairy'. If this is allowed, soft flakes mixed with the dust that can come into the 'kitchen spur' aka the combustion chamber. The side-effect, the cylinder surface will be scratched.
Caring for cardboard filters, relatively easy. Lift the filter from the nest, then clean with an air compressor. If necessary, tap on the edge of the filter using a screwdriver handle to fall off all the dirt.


Unlike the filters are made of sponge. Generally able to hold up to 15,000 miles or one year life. As light as this one, take care of him too easily. Dip a sponge filter into the water, then wash using detergent. Once completely clean, dry with aerated or dried in the sun but do not let the sun hit it directly. After drying, the filter ready to be installed again.
To filter made from cotton fibers, a different story. This one, rada treatment is expensive, due to be cleaned using a special liquid. For K & N for example, there is a solution of cleaning itself. Cleaning which consists of a special soap and oil is, its use is rather special.
Once the filter is removed from his home, then the air filter devices diketok until all the dust and dirt falling all. However, when the 'knock' the air filter, try using a soft ground, such as tires for example.
The next stage is to flush the filter with running water and then sprayed with a special liquid soap. After settling for approximately 5 minutes, the filter is then flushed again with water. The process is repeated until the remaining washing water looks clearer.
Before the process of basting with oil is done, the filter must be dried. There are two recommended ways, ie, the first with a hair dryer or a compressor, but with the wind pressure as low as possible. End of the treatment process air filter covered with a special basting oil. (MBL / bun)
-translate fr. KapanLagi.com -

Windshield Wipers

BEHAVIOR
They wipe back and forth to swish the rain and snow off a viewing
quadrant so you can see the road ahead. Their melodic “wipe wipe
wipe” can lull you to sleep.




HABITAT
Wipers rest (park) at the base of the windshield, like a faithful dog resting at your feet.

HOW IT WORKS
Wipers are powered by an electric motor that turns a worm gear. A worm gear is a spiral of a raised edge wrapped around a metal cylinder, much like a metal screw. Worm gears are fundamentally different from other gears in several ways. They can radically increase the turning power, or torque, which is useful in applications such as windshield wipers where torque is need to push the long wiper across the windshield. 
Also, worm gears can change the direction of rotation. In the windshield wiper the worm gear changes the direction of the motor shaft’s rotation 90 degrees. The worm gear drives a second gear which is connected
to a cam or crank. The cam or crank converts the rotary motion of the motor into the back-and-forth motion of the wipers. Hand-operated rubber wipers were introduced in 1917 by the company that later became Trico, which is today the largest maker of windshield wipers. After World War I, the company introduced wipers powered not by electric motors, but by the vacuum pressure created in the intake manifold of the engine. This arrangement meant that the speed of the wipers was tied directly to the speed of the engine.
Electric motor wipers were introduced in 1926. Wipers for rear windows were added in 1959. Intermittent wipers were invented by engineer Robert Kearns (later sparking a series of lengthy patent infringement suits) and were introduced in 1969 on Ford’s model Mercury.

INTERESTING FACTS
Windshield wipers were invented before windshields were common in cars. In their early years, cars were a fair weather mode of transportation and had no use for wipers. Mary Anderson invented a simple wiper
for streetcar windows in 1903. Anderson lived most of her life in Birmingham, Alabama. But on a trip to New York she noticed how hard it was for a trolley driver to see through the windshield during a rainstorm, and this experience prompted her to invent the wiper. Wipers for headlights were added by Saab in 1970. Now rain-sensing wipers have appeared on luxury cars.




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  • All rights reserved
    Published by Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
    814 North Franklin Street
    Chicago, Illinois 60610
    ISBN: 978-1-55652-812-5
    Printed in the United States of America
    5 4 3 2 1
    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
    Sobey, Edwin J. C., 1948–
    A field guide to automotive technology / Ed Sobey.
    p. cm.
    Includes index.
    ISBN 978-1-55652-812-5
    1. Automobiles—Popular works. 2. Mechanics—Popular works. I. Title.
    TL146.5.S63 2008
    629.2—dc22
    2008046620


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  • Windshield

    BEHAVIOR
    Windshields block debris and water from the interior of the car while
    allowing the visibility needed for safe driving.
    HABITAT
    Windshields occupy the space between roof and hood on the front of
    the car and between the roof and trunk along the rear.
    HOW IT WORKS
    Windshields are a sandwich of polyvinyl butyrate (PVB) between two layers of glass. The PVB holds the two layers of glass together without distorting or limiting the optical qualities. This laminate makes the windshield almost shatterproof, so if it’s damaged it won’t launch shards of glass into people. The windshield is glued into the window frame. On motorcycles, the windshield is often made of acrylic plastic instead of glass.
    Windshield glass transmits nearly all visible light and most infrared light while reflecting most ultraviolet light. Thus, you can see out (and in, unless the windows are tinted) and the car heats up when left in the sun. However, you won’t get a sunburn (which is caused by ultraviolet rays) from sunlight passing through the windshield.
    INTERESTING FACTS
    In the United States about 13 million windshields are replaced each year.


    All rights reserved
    Published by Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
    814 North Franklin Street
    Chicago, Illinois 60610
    ISBN: 978-1-55652-812-5
    Printed in the United States of America
    5 4 3 2 1
    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
    Sobey, Edwin J. C., 1948–
    A field guide to automotive technology / Ed Sobey.
    p. cm.
    Includes index.
    ISBN 978-1-55652-812-5
    1. Automobiles—Popular works. 2. Mechanics—Popular works. I. Title.
    TL146.5.S63 2008
    629.2—dc22
    2008046620

    Spoiler

    BEHAVIOR
    On passenger cars and trucks, the chief purpose of having a spoiler is
    to make the car look cooler. In race cars spoilers (wings) push the rear
    of the car downward to increase the traction to improve both acceleration
    and braking.
    HABITAT
    Spoilers generally are found on the rear of the car body. However, some cars—NASCAR race cars, for example—and trucks have spoilers on their roofs. Less noticeable are spoilers beneath the front of passenger cars.
    HOW IT WORKS
    The word spoilers comes from the idea that the structures disrupt or spoil the natural flow of air over the car. Technically spoilers and wings are different, although they are lumped together here. Wings are aerodynamic devices whose purpose is to move air. In airplanes they push air downward so the plane has lift. In cars, wings are upside down so they push the car down to give it better traction. Race cars have them over the rear or driving wheels to provide better traction.
    NASCAR cars now have safety wings (called spoilers) on the roof to provide downward force when the car is moving backward at high speed. You might wonder why race cars need downward force when moving opposite to the normal direction of driving. NASCAR cars have a tendency to fly when traveling backward after a collision or spin out.
    A car moving backward at high speeds generates so much lift that it lifts off the ground, making it uncontrollable. Roof spoilers apply downward force to reduce the chance of lift-offs after accidents.
    Passenger cars use devices to cover parts of the car to make them more aerodynamic, reducing drag. A belly pan under a car can smooth the air flow and keep it away from uneven surfaces.
    Trucks use spoilers to divert air up and over their trailers. The flat front surface of a trailer presents a large drag surface. The spoiler pushes air up and over this surface. Stylistic spoilers don’t have aerodynamic or wing shapes. They sit on the rear of red sporty cars looking cool.

    All rights reserved
    Published by Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
    814 North Franklin Street
    Chicago, Illinois 60610
    ISBN: 978-1-55652-812-5
    Printed in the United States of America
    5 4 3 2 1
    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
    Sobey, Edwin J. C., 1948–
    A field guide to automotive technology / Ed Sobey.
    p. cm.
    Includes index.
    ISBN 978-1-55652-812-5
    1. Automobiles—Popular works. 2. Mechanics—Popular works. I. Title.
    TL146.5.S63 2008
    629.2—dc22
    2008046620